Properties

IFRA Standards

IFRA Standards Introduction to IFRA IFRA regulations, also known as the IFRA Standards, are guidelines set by the International Fragrance Association (IFRA) to ensure the safe use of fragrances. These standards are based on scientific research and risk assessments by independent experts. IFRA membership is voluntary, but their standards are widely recognized by governments and followed by about 80% of the fragrance industry globally. IFRA Standards are not the only requirement for fragrance safe...
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Workplace Exposure Limits

Workplace Exposure Limits Exposure limits are upper legal limits used as a safety measure to prevent over exposure to hazardous substances. Exposure can be through breathing in fumes, or dust, through skin contact, injection, or ingestion. Workplace exposure limits are defined for hazardous substances that present a possible threat to human life and/or health. Workplace exposure limits (WELs) are subject to time-weighted averages (TWA). The long-term exposure limit (LTEL) or 8 hour reference per...
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Item Origins

Item Origins Item Origins is functionality within Formpak whereby the same Raw Material may be managed from different origins e.g. Natural, Synthetic, Carryover. This may be useful where a customer permits a natural origin, but prohibits a synthetic origin, or if legislation allows trace carryover amounts, but prohibits directly added. For example – Origins of Estragole. Natural Tarragon oil contains 80% Regulatory Estragole. Synthetic Estragole contains 100% Regulatory Estragole. Note that Ta...
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IFRA Classes 1 and 6

IFRA Classes 1 and 6 IFRA Classes 1 and 6 have an additional requirement – due to the possibility of ingestion, the materials used in the fragrance must also be approved for use in food. IFRA advise this means ‘that all ingredients should be listed as having “no safety concern”, for example by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) and/or as Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) in accordance with the US Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act’. When...
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Setting up Cosmetic Allergens for Declarations

Setting up Cosmetic allergens, so they can be shown in an Allergen Declaration In summary you have to indicate which raw materials are the fundamental allergens using properties. This information is gathered into a list of allergens using the property ‘AGNINGDETAILS’ for the original 26 fragrance allergens and also ‘AGN2023INGDETAILS’ for the additional 57 fragrance allergens. These properties are found in the property group ‘Cosmetics & Detergents’. Origi...
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Automatic Processing

Process for setting up Automatic Processing Automatic processing ensures the properties of Raw Materials and Formulations are always up to date and allows the impact of these updates to generate revised documents for customers. Typically, Automatic Processing is scheduled to run out of office hours when Formpak is not in use. Caution is advised before making any changes as it may disrupt other out of hours actions. Automatic Processing has multiple steps: Recalculate for Property Type – Select...
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IFRA 51st Amendment

IFRA 51st Amendment The IFRA 51st Amendment is available to view on the IFRA website The name of the property group in Formpak is ‘IFRA 49 Categories’ and will not be changed. Please do not rename it, as the name is referenced in the IFRA (49) Certificate logic, and it’s necessary to stay the same for the document to work correctly. If your data is up to date with IFRA 50th and are therefore routinely producing IFRA 50th Certificates, then you can change the document content of your IFRA c...
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Using Property Groups and Types

Using Property Groups and Types Properties have to belong to a Group and Type. These help to define and categorise the properties. An example of a Property Group could be “GHS Hazards” and within it are Property Types such as “GHS Pictograms”, “GHS Signal Words” and “GHS Precautions”. Then within these groups would be the individual properties such as “GHS_Flame”, “GHS_Danger” and “P102”. When you add a new prope...
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What are Lower Limits of Concentration?

What are Generic cut-offs/ lower limits of concentration? In GHS, and regional versions of it, there is a concept of relevance in relation to which components of a mixture ‘count’ when applying GHS mixture calculations. Effectively, you can ignore components below the generic cut-off limit when you calculate the hazards of a mixture. However there are circumstances which modify the generic situations. An example in CLP is the generic cut off for ingredients which are classified as Ha...
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What are Total Fractional Values?

What are Total Fractional Values A Total Fractional Value, or TFV, is the concentration of a hazardous ingredient divided by the generic concentration limit of that hazard for the ingredient(s). Why are TFVs useful? TFVs are useful because they show where a hazard (generally a Hazard classification) becomes applicable to a formulation. To discuss TFVs, it is useful to do a quick run through some other aspects of the legislation. In GHS regulations, a key method of determining hazards for a formu...
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